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Author QandA Bug Week - Airini Beautrais Uncategorized

QandA with Airini Beautrais

READ CLOSE: Bug Week is a collection of thirteen pieces of short fiction, meandering through time and the globe. Tell us about the intended links – and some of the unintended, surprising ones – that you think give these stories their shape as a collection.

AIRINI BEAUTRAIS: When I first envisioned writing a collection of short fiction, I wanted it to be thirteen unlucky tales of broken hearts and doomed love. I was about twenty-two when I had that idea, to give it some context! Some people say life gets more settled and less drama-filled when you get to your thirties, but mine didn’t. I think I had a bunch of things I wanted to write about, but when I did most of the work on consolidating the stories into a collection, a strong feminist theme emerged. I ended up with a range of female characters of varying ages from childhood to middle age. Other links might be nature and animals, poetry, museums, history, and small towns. These are all motifs I seem to keep coming back to in my writing. I’m really interested in how the past can shed light on contemporary life.

You’re an award-winning poet and essayist – could you tell us about how you find writing across disciplines, and how each style informs the others?

I think genre is probably overstated because it’s convenient for shelving books in a library, and making categories for awards. There are a lot of good books out there that hybridise or sidestep genres. I did my PhD thesis on narrative in contemporary long poems, and read a lot of verse narratives and verse novels. So I think it’s just ‘wherever the wind may take us’ when I sit down to write. Sometimes something feels like a poem, sometimes it feels like an essay and sometimes it feels like a fictional prose story. Sometimes it could be an essay poem or a story poem. Fiction gives you a kind of freedom to tell the truth. Poetry is helpful for concision and lyricality.

The stories often involve human interaction with animals – a clash between artifice and nature, in a sense. Are you interested in the place of human within the animal kingdom?

I’ve always been interested in the relationships between people and the natural environment, and that includes animals. I did an undergraduate degree in ecology and biodiversity so I’m a bit of a nature nerd. When started trying to write about nature I realized it was quite boring to me on its own and it is people in nature that are interesting to me. I went through a phase when I was about twelve of being a primitivist and thinking we should abandon technology and go and live in the forest. Now I have a 10 year old son who has come to a pretty similar conclusion. Climate change really frightens me. I get upset when I look at things like the fires in Australia and the US. I wonder what kind of world my children will be living in after I’m gone. We’re in the middle of an anthropogenic mass extinction event and I think that is one of the greatest tragedies of humankind. So yes, I am interested in our place in that. But I also think nature is a great healer, and animals can heal people. I’m holding one of my cats, Panther, in my author photo, because he symbolises me living my best life. I live with two cats and two children, I’m ridiculously happy and I feel like I can be who I am without self-censorship. Having non-human animals in the house is calming and reassuring.

There are some incredible short fiction writers working right now around the world. Who do you read for inspiration and influence when you are writing short stories?

Some of my influences, both living and dead, have been: Alice Munro, Doris Lessing, Margaret Atwood, Annie Proulx, Jeanette Winterson. Closer to home, Patricia Grace, Emily Perkins, Pip Adam and Tina Makereti are writers I really admire. I’ve also been influenced by poets who have worked with narrative, like Dorothy Porter and Anne Carson. I always feel badly read and like I need to branch out, read more diverse work and keep up with new writers.

Is there a story in Bug Week you might consider your favourite? Why/why not?

I don’t know about favourite but a story I feel I really inhabit is ‘The Teashop.’ It’s about a brothel madam who used to be a science teacher. I got really jaded with school teaching. I hated being called ‘Ms Beautrais’, I hated telling people to remove their nailpolish. I hated the intergenerational distrust between teenage girls and female staff. We should have been supporting and mentoring them, not bullying them into line. We should have been people they could look up to. So I had this dark fantasy about quitting and becoming a dominatrix. I didn’t do that, I just got pregnant and then I got pregnant again. But there’s still time! Esme, the main character in ‘The Teashop’ is really constrained by the fact that it’s the 1960s. She wanted to be a botanist but it was difficult for women to get into the sciences in the early 20th century. So now she’s a middle aged madam and she’s getting to the point where she wants to quit. The only way out she can see is getting married and she doesn’t want to do that either. It’s kind of a story about women and patriarchy and it’s kind of a story about ageing and anxiety. It brings in a lot of threads that are important to me.

In a wider sense, are there other writers or artists that you think have been a major touchstone for your writing career?

Apart from the writers I mentioned above, there are some dead poets I come back to over and over. When I was doing my PhD I read a book based on Dante’s Divina Commedia and I got really obsessed with Dante. I read a whole lot of translations. Although in many ways it’s politically and theologically limited to its time, in other ways, it’s this universal story of having messed up your life, found yourself lying in the middle of nowhere, and needing some help to get where you want to go. Dante is thirty-five at the start of the Inferno. Coming to in a dark wood was something I really related to in my mid thirties as well.

Another poem I keep coming back to is The Waste Land. I don’t agree with Eliot politically or personally but I really love that poem. I did a painting using the lines ‘A woman drew her long black hair out tight / And fiddled whisper music on those strings / And bats with baby faces in the violet light / Whistled, and beat their wings / And crawled head downward down a blackened wall.’ It’s meant to be this dark horror imagery but for me there’s a lot of female power lurking in those lines. Also I love bats.

I listen to a lot of music and play music, and I love visual art. I don’t know about direct influence on my writing. There were a couple of albums I was listening to a lot while I was writing many of these stories. One was Dive Deep by Morcheeba. My heart was broken and the song ‘Enjoy the ride’ made me feel better. (Stop chasing shadows, just enjoy the ride). The other was quite an obscure album, Scatterlings by Johnny Clegg and Savuka. Johnny was part of the soundtrack of my childhood. My parents basically listened to classical music and ‘world’ music. He did a lot of anti-racist work in his life and music. Scatterlings was released in 1982, the year I was born. The song I liked best was ‘Digging for some words’, which is appropriate when you are writing. I think it’s about nuclear war but the lyrics are quite enigmatic.

What are you reading right now? What is on your To Be Read pile?

I am a bad reader at the moment because I work too much. I’ve found 2020 a hard year to read in. I can’t seem to sit down for five minutes at a stretch. I am part way through Book 2 of Karl Ove Knausgaard’s My Struggle series. I like his writing but sometimes the masculinity gets too much for me. Stuff like where he gets angry at his wife for watching TV instead of cleaning up the house. Come on, Karl. I’m also part way through Fifteen Million Years in Antarctica by Rebecca Priestley. It’s a really absorbing read, I just need some quiet time to contemplate it. My to-read list is global and massive. Here are some local authors that are on it (NZers need to read more NZ writing!). I recently bought False River by Paula Morris. I love her essays and short stories; she really interrogates her subjects. And I am really excited about some new poetry collections, The Goddess Muscle by Karlo Mila and The Savage Coloniser Book by Tusiata Avia. VUP has published a lot of good books lately and on the top of my to-buy fiction list are The Swimmers by Chloe Lane and What Sort of Man by Breton Dukes. And I am really excited to get a hold of Laura Borrowdale’s Sex, With Animals. I love how brave she is and how committed she is to her projects, including running the journal Aotearotica. We are so lucky to be surrounded by so many talented people, and the best thing is, we can all meet each other in real life and talk about books over a wine.

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Author QandA The Swimmers - Chloe Lane Uncategorized

QandA with Chloe Lane

READ CLOSE: The main character, Erin, and both her mother and her aunt, were competitive swimmers. Tell us about why you chose this sport?

CHLOE LANE: I wrote The Swimmers when I was living in Florida. I was a competitive swimmer when I was a teenager, but I hadn’t swum for years. Florida helped me find my way back to it. The pools there are many and stunning, and it’s easy to swim outdoors for nine or ten months of the year, twelve months if you’re a little braver and willing to face the freezing temperatures of the short winter. My life in Florida was simple: I wrote, taught and took classes, and I swam. When I started thinking more deeply about who Erin, Aunty Wynn, and Erin’s mother were, the things they did and loved that helped to make them who they were, swimming was at the forefront of my own heart and mind. In addition to being members of the same family, I wanted there to be something at the beginning of the novel that bound these women together, even if it was only this sport.

I personally love how solitary swimming is. Even when I belonged to a club and trained for hours every day with other athletes, all of us moving up and down the lane with only an arm’s length between us, it was never a team pursuit. Come competition day you’re even more alone. It’s only you up there on the starting blocks. It takes a certain kind of person to be fulfilled by this kind of activity, I think. A self-centered, very focused and determined, maybe even obsessive personality. On the surface the three central women in The Swimmers seem very different, but they all share some of these personality traits: Erin’s mother has lived her life by her own rules, and for the most part done all of it alone, even admirably so; Erin wants to be part of something bigger, but in her heart she’s still too selfish and ambitious to make room for other people; and some of the things the reader learns about Aunty Wynn in the novel reveals how self-centered she can be too. What these women experience over the five days of The Swimmers shakes some of this up, but this is where we first find them, where we begin.

You could never have known how timely the topic of euthanasia would be, with the referendum timed for not long after publication. Are you interested in bio-ethical issues, or was this story driven by character?

I wanted to find out what it would look like for a regular Kiwi family to help take the life of one of their own. I wanted to see the logistics of that play out. But more importantly, I wanted to see what kind of emotional toll it would take on the people involved. The first version of this story was a short I brought to Jill Ciment’s workshop at the University of Florida (UF). It was a grainy piece about a fractured family coming together to scatter the ashes of a recently deceased member. Jill was the one to point out I was trying to cram too much into this short piece and that it wasn’t working. She showed me all the places I could begin to “crack it open” and suggested that I should try a longer form, take my time with it, go deeper. So while this is a story about assisted suicide––that’s what gives the novel its forward momentum––I think of it more as a story about family and some of the ways we get each other and miss each other, some ways we can hurt and save. On the journey to helping Erin’s mother receive a peaceful death on her own terms, Erin and Aunty Wynn do some morally questionable things. Though if I’ve done my job correctly, hopefully it’s what they reveal of themselves along the way, the small ways they change and leave themselves vulnerable, which gives the story its emotional payoff.

The Swimmers looks at beauty and ugliness, at success and failure. It’s a fiction that talks about physical prowess, artistic talent, and judgment: tell us about the process of writing a novel to create a world that investigates these ideas with women as the driving force of the novel.

I went to a girls’ high school in Auckland where it was drummed into us every day and then shouted to us from the stage every school assembly that we were exceptional young women and we could do anything we wanted with our lives. Some of the girls I went to school with were exceptional and now they’re out there in the world doing what they do and ruling at it. For the rest of us, this insane positivity was more of a double-edged sword. Yes, we all deserve to feel good about ourselves, to feel supported, to want and to not be ashamed of that want. But it’s also a bit of a shock to step out into the world and realise you’re only mediocre and that maybe your idea of yourself is not quite right.

For Erin, being able to make art and swim, to be able to do these things at the highest level so that others may experience some level of curiosity or amazement, be moved in some way––that was her dream. Through her failure to achieve this she understands that hard work and sacrifice are important, but that they’re not everything, that if you’re without that thing we call talent or natural ability, then it doesn’t matter how many kilometres you swim in the pool every day. At this stage in her life this is something she is struggling with, being what she thinks of as talentless. This is why she can only see herself in respect to someone else’s achievements. For example, her swimming career vs. Aunty Wynn’s, or how little she has to offer at twenty-six vs. everything Karl’s (her ex-lover’s) forty-year-old wife has to offer.

Some early readers of the manuscript thought it was strange to place art and sport side by side in the book, and for Erin to be as moved by witnessing an athlete in the pool as she was by a painting. I don’t believe these things are actually very far apart. I think about what happens when I walk into a museum or someone’s home and there is a painting hanging on the wall that stirs something inside of me. Maybe I just like the colours, the movement of the brushstrokes, maybe it reminds me of something, a room from my childhood, a place I visited once, or maybe it pushes at a feeling inside of me that I can’t quite describe. But why do I watch sport? Because I like the feeling of my pulse quickening when the person or the team I’m rooting for is doing well or not. And how satisfying is it to witness the human body at its best? I also like to remember what it was like to be fit, strong and quick, though I probably enjoy the sadness of losing that too, of the ways my body has since failed or disappointed me. At the end of it, the best experiences of these things make me feel something, good or bad, fun or dark, and maybe help me know myself a little better. Erin gets that too.

What books, film, art or music have influenced your writing?

Probably the biggest breakthrough I had with my writing, and this was something that happened while I was studying at UF, was letting go of the kind of writer I wanted to be for the kind of writer I could be. Jill Ciment helped me a lot with this. So did Padgett Powell. Padgett’s mentor was Donald Barthelme, and his reading lists included Samuel Beckett, Thomas Bernhard, Flann O’Brien, and Barthelme. But the one author we read every week, his Collected Stories becoming a sort of bible for Padgett’s class, was the Irish author William Trevor. Some of Trevor’s stories are the singularly most devastating things I’ve ever read, likely ever will read. While I’m writing this I’m thinking about a scene from a Trevor story that I haven’t read in years, but that still pulls at me, tears me up. They’re traditional stories, no games. Reading Trevor made me see that style is style, that it’s in you or it isn’t, and even then if those fun and tricks on the page are not in service of a truckload of humanity, then they’re just that––fun and tricks. Fun and tricks can be great, but Padgett used to quote Barthelme here: “What must wacky modes do? Break their hearts.” I’d been so focused on trying to write with style I’d forgotten what writing can do, the best thing about it. So I stopped trying to write in wacky mode and instead I focused on putting the sentences down on the page in the clearest way possible. It started to work then.

I guess if I could only read one author for the rest of my life William Trevor would be a top contender. Up there with him would be Joy Williams, Alice Munro, Anne Enright and, though she has been less of an influence and more of goddess to worship at the feet of, Flannery O’Connor.

I always look at books as part of a wider conversation. Tell me two or three books you would like to see The Swimmers sit alongside in conversation, books that would inform and augment a reader’s experience of your novel.

A couple of books came out while I was working on The Swimmers that I really enjoyed, and that to a lesser or greater extent are narrated by young women at crossroads, while also exploring narratives around difficult families. These are Hot Milk by Deborah Levy and Goodbye, Vitamin by Rachel Khong. One of my absolute favourite authors is Anne Enright. Her novel The Gathering is one I come back to again and again. She writes about family unhappiness with such unflinching clarity, intelligence, heartbreaking honesty, but also with a humour that is so slight and dark it works like another punch to the guts.

What are you reading right now? What is on your To Be Read pile?

I’m just about finished reading Pip Adam’s Nothing to See, which is so tough and funny and unbelievably moving. I was recently trying to describe Pip’s writing to someone, the often breathless quality of it, and the best I could come up with was that it felt a bit like rolling down a hill where you feel like you’ve lost control, you’re at the mercy of gravity. But before you crash or careen off the edge of the cliff, Pip catches you, and you realise that you weren’t falling, that she was pulling you along and always in control, taking you exactly the direction she wanted to take you. It’s a wild and rewarding ride. Next on my “for fun” list are A Girl’s Story by Annie Ernaux and Miss Jane by Brad Watson. I’ve also got a few things I’m re-reading in connection to the new novel I’m working on: A Separation by Katie Kitamura, Dept. of Speculation by Jenny Offill and Joy Williams’ incredible travel guide on the Florida Keys.

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Author QandA Sprigs - Brannavan Gnanalingam

QandA with Brannavan Gnanalingam

READ CLOSE: Sprigs is set in the world of Wellington private schools. Although there are plenty of characters who are adults, the novel focuses on teenagers – tell us about your research into teens in 2018, and how you created a world full of their concerns and their behaviours and their speech?

BRANNAVAN GNANALINGAM: My starting point for the teenagers was that the differences across generations of teenagers aren’t as stark as older people think – there are the same concerns and same desires, but all that changes is the technology / media and the argot. So I thought very hard about my teenage years and how we behaved / thought / talked.

I read a lot online, listened to YouTube videos of teenagers, eavesdropped on public transport, and listened to how a lot of younger people talked. That said, I knew I’d never get true fidelity to contemporary teenagers’ language, so I created dialogue that felt real to me and real to the story, and hoped for the best.

I credit contemporary teenagers with being a bit more aware of the world than I was, but I was also conscious that exclusive environments, like the schools in question, have their own rules / logic, that helps shape people.

This is a novel that is deeply concerned with big issues of Aotearoa in our time, sliced through with humour that leans into the absurd irony of life. Do you have any writers, books, or TV or film that you look to as influencing or informing your writing?

I think the biggest influence would be the Ukrainian filmmaker Kira Muratova. She made deeply political and black films until relatively recently when she died. I saw a retrospective of her films in 2013 and it basically reshaped how I thought about tone and empathy and anger. A good starting point for her films would be Melody for a Street Organ, which is about two orphans wandering the wintery streets of Kiev looking for food / shelter, while the adults around them try to rip them off.

Another big influence is the Belarusian journalist Svetlana Alexievich, who wrote about big events and trauma and politics in such personal, harrowing ways. They’re written so gently, but so devastatingly.

In terms of writers from Aotearoa, the biggest influences on this book itself would have been Tina Makereti’s The Imaginary Lives of James Pōneke (particularly in the way she shows how a subject is constituted and re-constituted via trauma), Pip Adam’s The New Animals, and Carl Shuker’s The Lazy Boys. I’d also add a new generation of Māori writers are absolutely inspiring in their refusal to compromise their work / politics – I’m thinking of the likes of Tayi Tibble, Anahera Gildea, essa may ranapiri, Hana Pera Aoake etc.. I think they’re showing how to hold true to oneself, while also making radical art (without caring what people like me would think).

I’ve not encountered many novels with a content warning – the closest I’ve seen perhaps would be a copy of American Psycho wrapped in plastic in the bookshop – and plenty of novels I have read include rape. Do you think this should be standard in books, like a classification rating on films and TV?

It’s funny because this has seemed to be a major talking point, and I don’t really understand why! I think the literary community is way too snooty about these. It’s not as if people used to walk into video stores and complain about the warning stickers there. I’ve included content warnings in all except my first book, but this is by far, the most detailed / necessary I think in all of my books.

I think they should be par for the course. The function of art is to manipulate your audience. If one of the ways you’ll be manipulating your audience is via something that is traumatic, then it’s only fair that you give people a heads up, so they can decide whether they want to read it or not. Given this book is about sexual violence, readers should feel more than welcome not to read it, or if they want to read it, they know what they’re in for. People make decisions about what they choose to read or not to read all of the time, and I think this is simply part of helping someone make that choice.

I also don’t see it as a big deal or a free speech issue. I didn’t change what I wrote about in the book. I don’t think I pulled any punches. If you’re not going to be affected by the subject matter or don’t care for the content warning, then you could treat it like how everyone treats the ISBN page and just ignore it.

Almost all the adults characters in Sprigs are flawed, leaving them incompetent and unhelpful for the teenagers who need their care and guidance. Could you tell us about how you see the dynamic between secondary school age children and the adults who run the world they are attempting to navigate, and how it succeeds and how it fails?

I have commonly written about incompetent and ignorant adults, and the way these adults collude with, or create, unequal power structures. I think it’s an obvious point, but just because someone is a buffoon, it doesn’t mean they’re not dangerous. I also think one of the major ways structural inequalities are actually and actively maintained is because when adults are put to the test, they end up falling back on self-interested, stereotypical ways. They look for the easy way out because they think it’s the only way to react.

I’m interested in how much someone is shaped by an institution or a particular discursive framework. I think certain types of masculine ideals in particular are very well established for boys by the time they’re teenagers, and they aren’t too different from what adults have also helped define. I remember how much idiotic stuff I believed / understood to be true when I was teenager and young adult (and how I still have to continue to unlearn things).

I was really interested in exploring whether there is room for people to escape these frameworks and if there is agency. And how much the worst of the teenage behaviour is simply a reflection of adult behaviour. There’ll always be gaps and space for people to resist (ideologies have to be constantly re-won, for example), but it will require people to be aware of the frameworks in the first place. And people not to rely on the ‘easy’ way out. While the title sprigs obviously refers to the sprigs on a rugby boot, the part of the boot that allows you to run while in the mud, or to ruck an opponent, I also had in mind plants and growth and buds.

If Sprigs were to be made into a TV series or a film, would you want to be involved in the casting and the screenplay? Would you have any preference for actors or directors?

Oh, I hadn’t thought of that. My background is film (I have an MA in it) so scriptwriting is something I’ve done in the past. However, I’ve often treated my books as something that is done, and I move onto the next thing. I struggle to get myself back into the book once it’s finished.

If this was made into a film / TV series, then I would have requirements though – Priya would have to be played by a Tamil actor, and the director or directors would need to be non-white. This is because the book is also about white supremacy and how non-white people are able to move in such spaces.

I always look at books as part of a wider conversation. Tell me two or three books you would like to see Sprigs sit alongside in conversation, books that would inform and augment a reader’s experience of your novel.

I think it’ll sit very nicely alongside two recent Wellington novels – Pip Adam’s Nothing to See and David Coventry’s Dance Prone. Both are brilliant books that similarly deal with trauma and memory and toxic behaviours, and I’d like to think my book touches on similar ground.

What are you reading at the moment? What is on your ‘To Be Read’ pile?

I’m enjoying being able to read for pleasure at the moment! I’ve just finished Dance Prone [David Coventry]. The next books I’ll read, I think, are Exquisite Cadavers by Meena Kandasamy, Necropolitics by Achille Mbembe, and Fortress Besieged by Qian Zhongshu.

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Author QandA The Girl In The Mirror - Rose Carlyle

QandA with Rose Carlyle

READ CLOSE: Your debut novel The Girl in The Mirror is a racy, pacy thriller – could you tell us about the writing of this book?

ROSE CARLYLE: I feel as though this story fell out of the sky fully formed, and I had no choice but to write it down. I’ve heard other writers (such as Elizabeth Gilbert) describe the feeling that the story chooses the writer, and although I don’t believe in supernatural stuff, there was something a bit spooky about the process.

My sister, Madeleine, and I were both trying to write novels and both considering trashing them and starting fresh with new ideas. One day at lunch, Maddie mentioned she would like to write a twin story. I felt as though I knew what she was going to say before she said it, because I wanted to write a twin story too. When we put our ideas together, the magic happened. We had the key plot points planned within an hour.

So it was as if the story was floating around in the sky, and half of it fell into my lap and half into Maddie’s. We had to put the halves together to make the story complete. Fortunately, Maddie wanted me to write the story, but she has put an enormous amount of energy into it, too. She’s like a pre-editor, helping me shape the story before, during and after the writing process.

Twins are such a fascinating pairing in a novel. Could you tell us why you made your protagonists twins and how that doubling and symmetry works in the novel storytelling?

To me, the special thing about fiction is that it allows you to inhabit someone else’s mind. I don’t know any other art form that creates such a deep experience of living somebody else’s experience. Movies come close, but in a movie you are usually still watching the characters from the outside. When you finish reading Jane Eyre, you feel that you are Jane. Sometimes that feeling persists for a long time.

I wanted to take that idea one step further. If readers love being somebody else, what about a story about a character who tries to become someone else for real? I wasn’t drawn to writing sci-fi or fantasy, so a way for me to explore that idea was with identical twins.

Iris and Summer sail across the Indian Ocean, and you write this part of the novel with such clarity and evoke the feeling of isolation and beauty so well. You obviously have an affinity with the sea and sailing: do you think the ocean and its latent danger will feature in future work?

Yes, I think I can safely say the ocean will feature in future work, because I never plan to write about the ocean, but it always manages to sneak in. I wish I could have depicted the ocean as less dangerous, though. In real life, sailing is not scary. Perhaps one day I will write a book in which the ocean is better behaved.

If The Girl in The Mirror is made into a film, who would you love to see in the role of Iris and Summer?

My kids have been fan-casting the novel since I read them a sample chapter back in 2018. One son votes for Samara Weaving, the other for Margot Robbie, but the running joke in our household is that one of them could play each twin. My daughter, Florence, wants her namesake Florence Pugh. I can only tell you who is perfect for the audiobook and that is Holly Robinson. When I heard her audition tape, I felt as though they found the real Iris. I’m told the audiobook will be ready in August and I’m extremely excited about it.

If The Girl In The Mirror was sitting on my bookshelf, what two or three other books would you hope to see stacked beside it?

I would hope to see War and Peace, The Best American Science Writing of 2019, and The Day My Bum Went Psycho, because I hope that people read all sorts of books—and, like me, don’t have time to organise their bookshelves. I didn’t learn how to write a thriller by religiously reading other thrillers. I believe that everything you read influences your writing somehow, so you’ve got more chance of finding your own voice if you read widely and randomly. I’m a big fan of picking up some forgotten treasure at your friend’s uncle’s bach and reading it in order to learn what was once popular. Or just read it because it’s a book and you’re a reader.

Tell us about some of the books and the writers who have been influential in your writing.

I know I’m meant to list other thrillers, but honestly, some of them are too scary for me. I’m sure there are writers who have influenced me, but I don’t know who they are, because I’ve read thousands of books in my life and they’re all blended together in my brain like a soup that’s been cooking too long. So, my all-time faves include Austen, the Brontë sisters, George Eliot, the Russians from Tolstoy to Nabokov, and Marilynne Robinson. How you get from there to writing a thriller is beyond me.

What are you reading now? What is on your To Be Read pile?

Now I’m going to contradict myself because I just advocated for serendipitous reading, but I don’t have much time for it these days. As a Kiwi author who is published in Australia, America and the UK, it’s almost part of the job description to keep up with the latest thrillers from all these countries, as well as other notable fiction from anywhere in the world. I also feel that I want to keep delving into the past. There are still some classics I haven’t read, like Don Quixote. Right now I am halfway through Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, The Year of Pleasures by Elizabeth Berg and All the Birds, Singing by Evie Wyld. Then I want to catch up with the latest thrillers by Chris Hammer and Ruth Ware.

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Author QandA Dance Prone - David Coventry

QandA with David Coventry

READ CLOSE: Dance Prone is your second novel and is concerned with friendship, trauma, and music. Tell us about your musical tastes and how this novel connects and intersects with other art forms?

DAVID COVENTRY: My music tastes run all over the show, but lean towards those termed as punk, post-punk, hardcore, post-hardcore, post-rock, on and on. But then again they don’t. I love all the music that appears in this book. But there’s a lot of music outside of the novel love too. I also adore some terrible, dreadful bands, just because they tickle me.

But to name some, my life feels in debt to bands and musicians like Big Star, The Velvet Underground, Patti Smith, The Gordons, Nico, Wire, John Cale, The Stooges, PJ Harvey, Nick Drake, Blondie, Steve Reich, Joy Division, Lou Reed, NEU!, Slint, Judy Still, Codeine, Galaxie 500, New Order, Television, Minor Threat, Cate Le Bon, The Replacements, Swans, Suicide, Can, Talking Heads, Hüsker Dü, NWA, Brian Eno, Jim O’Rourke, Cat Power, Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy, The Dirty Three, The Fall, The Rolling Stones, Sonic Youth, Public Enemy, The Enemy. All the music that was boiling up in NZ when I was a teenager. So many bands, the Flying Nun explosion that was an almost un-trackable phenomena of greatness during the 1980s. Tanker by Bailter Space is an album still does my head in. I heard it the week it came out and I still remember the moment sitting in my flat with my friends going: How? What? What is that sound? It was so heavy but so pretty and strange. I still ask these questions. Things like that were life-changing. But near to every weekend from the age of 18 to near 40 I was in some stinking bar listening to bands – so to name any falls short of the gamut of acts I have loved for a night and never seen again but felt changed by. 

Then there’s Bowie. Then there’s lots of folk music. Then there’s Neil Young, the Beach Boys and the Jesus Lizard. Then there’s masses of experimental stuff, electronic stuff. Then there’s Dylan and Led Zeppelin, John Coltrane and Ornette Coleman, Alice Coltrane, the Skeptics, and, um, Supertramp. Big Black, Siege, Stevie Nicks and Nina Simone, Mayhem and the Staple Singers. It doesn’t stop, not really. But as an art form, I desire music, and I guess we’re talking rock music here, to aggressively challenge itself to maintain the hard simplicity of what was shaped into rock ‘n’ roll in the 50s, but also not kowtow any perceived rubric of what rock ‘n’ roll is. I like the sound of guitar feeding back. Especially if it is out of tune. That has always been more rock ‘n’ roll to me than any rock hero guitar solo.

How this relates to art in the novel is this: writing about music in a fiction setting, the conceptual, emotional and intellectual yield of the form, is near impossible. Hence, I wanted to construct several mirrors of the punk rock scene. So, Paloma and Joan George-Warren. In the novel, Joan is constructing a society that attempts to deliberately mimic the culture of religious institutions, and she does this, she claims, as an act of art. It’s an attempt to understand in a secular setting the effects of the sacred and – let us say – tribal religiosity, its rituals and affects. Which is a kind of narcissistic reflection of what’s occurring as the band travel through the U.S. Punk and hardcore, they kind of operate as a wider art form than what is just on stage, the culture that forms around it might be considered the real art form, a mechanism of societal change and enlightenment. Hence, Joan comes into the text to mirror this and show this idea. And Paloma, she is trying to rectify the historical revisionism occurring in archaeological sites and so on. Which is kinda what punk, in my mind, should also be trying to do if it ever finds itself imitating previous versions of itself. I want punk to be taken seriously as an art form in the novel, hence the multiple mirrors of form. Though, you create mirrors and who knows what people are going to see in them.

Your novel moves about in time – 1985 and then post-millennium, 2002, 2004, 2019. We’d love to hear about how you believe time, especially two decades, shifts a person’s dreams, their fears, and their beliefs about themselves.

Hmm. Time shouldn’t do anything to your dreams, not really. Just fine-tune them. Myself, I have the same drive to make art as I did when I was a young twit with absolutely zero right to be dabbling in any form. In fact, the drive is much stronger now than ever. I don’t feel hindered in any way at all expect by health problems and so on. But fears, yes, that’s something else. They grow stronger as the body weakens, I think.

But certainly, the focus of the intent to make art has shifted. I remember when I was a 16 I told my girlfriend I was going to be a writer. Which is hilarious to me now as I didn’t even read books! I didn’t know the first thing about anything to do with writing except for this belief that I would be one, which is nuts. I didn’t even write, but I was going to be a writer! I decided, too, I’d also be a musician, despite having zero ability until I was about 22 or 23 when I actually began to be able to play the guitar. The drive is a very strange and mysterious thing, but vital. Without it and the crazy belief that goes on alongside it, I wouldn’t have ever done anything. I still have a ridiculous urge to play music, despite having a long career as a failed musician! Only time and energy hold that back.

If Dance Prone were to be a film, would you have any ideas about who should be cast or direct?

This is the silliest, silliest question, but, yes, fun to play. Firstly, the thing about writing a book in first person is that only the author ends up knowing what the main character looks like. The narrator hones in on the looks of the other characters but leaves himself out of it.

However, I was re-watching Twin Peaks: The Return a few weeks ago and there’s the nutso scene with Sam and Tracey in New York, in a room, with a glass box. I was looking at Sam (Benjamin Rosenfield) and I thought: Oh, oh, that’s Conrad. Rosenfield seemed to have the correct disposition of detached forcefulness to play Conrad Welles. 

To direct, I think maybe someone like Kelly Reichardt or Andrea Arnold. Definitely a woman. I find myself very tired of men after writing this book! Maybe Crystal Moselle who created and directed the brilliant HBO series Betty. I freaking loved that series.

Let’s say Dance Prone was sitting on my bookshelf, tell me what two or three other books you’d like to see beside it?

The Names Don DeLillo.

Stone Arabia Danna Spiotta

Airships Barry Hannah

The United States of America is a character in its own right in this novel the book is about road trips through college towns and wandering walks through small towns and sprawling urban cities. We’d love to know more about your own relationship with the USA and your experience of writing about it from Wellington.

I wouldn’t say it’s specifically about any of these things as such. Rather, I’d say these are settings for the book that goes searching for answers to questions of memory, art, trauma, ritual and a very specific moment in punk rock history and how it has echoed through decades. But yes, the USA and Morocco are very powerful settings. And they are the only settings I could think of for the novel. I tried setting it in NZ, but that didn’t work. I thought about the UK, but that didn’t feel right. I needed a much larger geographical and cultural space for these outcasts to move about in. I needed the possibility of heated deserts and whiteout snow.

But yes, I spent a couple of months driving around the USA about 15 years ago. It was great, magnificent and appalling. An immense country full of stupid and great things. It’s always an honour to travel through other people’s lands and you have to pay that back in some way. The thing you learn, obviously, is that it’s very hard to know things about the country. It’s so divisive and diverse in its physicality, in peoples, in dialects, in modes of thought, in sensations of self, tribalism, religiosity, of ideology. I found that the language there of my – if I can say (and maybe I can’t) ­– peers to be vastly different to how I, or the people I know here in NZ, would approach difficult topics. It puts you on the outside, which is a place of comfort in some ways. I guess it’s the not knowing that draws me to a place. Of always being an outsider. It feels dangerous and danger is always the best trigger to start writing.

Could you let us know the writers and books that have had the most influence on your life and your writing career?

I have a dear friend, now rightly a lecturer in the US, who one day, close to 30 years ago, turned up at my flat in Mount Vic and handed over two books and said: Read these. Tell me what you think. Those two books were Vineland by Thomas Pynchon, and White Noise by Don DeLillo. While I loved the former, it was the latter that changed my life. I was 22 and didn’t really know how to read, as in really read, and it was that book and then Libra by the same author and several others that taught me what literary works were all about. So, yes, Don DeLillo and Raymond Carver, Barry Hannah. That was the initial burst that launched my reading and all, each of those writers had a huge influence, but DeLillo most of all. Then another wave during my thirties. Another in my forties. These day folk like Dana Spiotta, Elif Batuman, Rachel Cusk, Sally Rooney, Jamie Quatro are having life-altering effects on me. Miranda July’s first novel got me in a weird place. 

What are you reading now? What is next to be read?

For the last several years I haven’t been very well (I have ME/CFS, really messes with basic cognitive stiff) and I haven’t been able to read except in very occasional and small doses. That changed a couple of weeks ago with a surprise reduction of symptoms. I woke up and discovered I could read. I picked up the first book on the nightstand. It was Sally Rooney’s Conversations with Friends. It has been a magnificent experience. Literally, I have been discovering reading again, and it’s like being a kid and seeing your first movie. What a joyful thing. The sudden and beautiful explosions of intellect you didn’t know you had the capacity to grasp. So I’m in the last pages of that and it’s been wonderful. Next up I’m going to read Nothing to See, by Pip Adam. It sounds like a blast and Pip is an excellent, excellent person and I have been looking forward to reading her for the longest time but haven’t been well enough to do so. Then, maybe Sado, by Mikaela Nyman. The release of her novel came at the moment of the lockdown and got lost; it deserves some love. I read an early draft of it two years ago and really look forward to seeing how the book completed itself because it was all there, just waiting.

I would assume Dance Prone would have a playlist – what songs would be on it? Is there somewhere readers can listen to your ideal playlist?

Yes, there is indeed a playlist…..It has near every song or band that is mentioned in the book, plus a few more who the band might’ve been listening to over the decades. Hence, it is really, really long!

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Author QandA Nothing to See - Pip Adam Uncategorized

QandA with Pip Adam

READ CLOSE: Nothing To See has such an incredible cover. Could you tell us more about the process of design for this book?

PIP ADAM: Working with VUP on covers is really fun. We send ideas back and forward. It’s very collaborative and also acts a really good exercise in working out exactly what the book is about and how best to talk about the book.

My memory of how this cover came about is we were having a lot of back and forward and, although we had some good ideas, nothing was sticking. I think I was being a bit difficult because I wasn’t sure I wanted an identifiable person on the cover.

I was in Sephora in Auckland and there was a poster where two women were cheek to cheek each with different eye liner and I thought, Hmm. So, I found a stock picture of two people cheek to cheek to everyone. Everyone had been talking about asking the incredible Russel Kleyn [https://russellkleyn.com/] to take the photo for the cover. This excited me heaps because I love Russel’s work.

Russell recommended Franca and took the photos and then Fergus laid the cover out. It was very exciting for me. I have never had a real person on my book before and I feel very grateful to Franca – it’s no small thing to allow your likeness to be used to interpret someone else’s art. I particularly like the cover because I don’t think Russel simply mirrored the image – this means both halves of Franca’s face are slightly different. I think this is slightly more un-nerving, which I really like.

If Nothing To See were to be made as a film or TV show, who would you cast in the roles?

I don’t think I would want to cast this myself. I think my answer for this question goes back to my resistance to having an actual person on the cover of the book. I have this hope, which I think is possibly a cop-out, that people will build the identity of the characters for themselves. I’m quite light on description of characters, purposefully, and I think in my head, I often don’t see characters. Instead, I kind of experience them from inside. I hope what this means is that people who read the book can do the same.

I think this was part of the discussion we had around the cover. People were talking about a ‘non-descript’ or ‘unrecognisable’ person on the cover and we always kept landing on this ideal of ‘normal’ that I felt didn’t represent the way I had been trying to write the characters. I think ‘normal’ often means ‘closest to the people in power’ and, like I say, I have this idea that if I write characters the way I do, there’s space for people to insert people who look like they do into the work.

Like I say, I’m aware that maybe this is a cop-out for facing the harder questions around including characters who have experiences different from mine.

I always imagine books existing in conversation with other booksIf you could place Nothing To See with two or three other books that it would ‘speak’ to, which books would they be?

One book I had in mind was Phillip K. Dick’s A Scanner Darkly because of its interest in addiction and the way it talks about this in a science fiction world. I also have a lot to owe Ocean Vuong’s On Earth We are Briefly Gorgeous which is a work that holds itself strong as a novel despite being linked strongly with autobiography.

Are there any books or writers you see as the most influential in your writing?

Bae Suah has been incredibly influential. Bae Suah writes the feminine experience like no other writer I can think of.

I also think Nothing to See owes so much to the TV series The Leftovers and the work of Brit Marling and Zal Batmanglij both of which were a touchstone for the book.

The Leftovers reminded me that what I was more interested in was the lived experience of the people in an unusual situation, than the mechanics of the situation. Tom Perrotta’s book series begins with a preface which explains a lot about the occurrence and it was interesting to see how much information could be left out of the TV show and it still be satisfying.

I am very obsessed with the idea of ambiguity – or the possibility of two things being true at the same time and that’s where I turn to Brit Marling and Zal Batmanglij work. I am always in awe of the way they manage to keep two realities alive at the same time – resisting resolution – but still make fully engaging and exciting work.

If there was a playlist to accompany Nothing To See, what songs would you have on that list?

Oddly, there is a playlist for Nothing to See J It includes, music from each of the years the book takes place in, quite a bit of Aldous Harding, Fever Ray, Orchestra of Spheres, Car Sseat Headrest (‘Bodies’ in particular), The Knife and Sufjan Stevens.

Tell me how you challenge yourself as a writer, and how you see fiction writing in particular continue to grow stronger in New Zealand?

I think being a writer in New Zealand comes with quite a few in-built challenges and I guess part of how I challenge myself is by trying to find ways to lessen these challenges for other writers. I’m always interested in ways to make room for other writers because I think this is the only way to strengthen fiction writing. I often fail at these very badly and I guess this is another way I try to challenge myself – it’s tempting when I fail to give up, to retreat back into my privilege where I’m safe, but when I mess up I try really hard to not do this. I think often I expect living this way to be straightforward and like a smooth improvement but it is messy and I fail in all sorts of new ways but I can’t see an alternative at the moment and I want change very badly.

What are you reading right now? What is next to be read?

Right at this moment I am reading incredible work in progress from some amazing writers who I’m working with at a couple of tertiary institutions and through a mentoring programme. I get extremely excited when I read this work. I have also really enjoyed the work in Stasis Journal [https://www.stasisjournal.com] which has been an amazing project.

I am really looking forward to reading Almond by Won-Pyung Sohn and Time is the Thing a Body Moves Through by T Fleischmann.

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Author QandA The Secrets Of Strangers - Charity Norman Uncategorized

QandA with Charity Norman

READ CLOSE: The Secrets of Strangers has a quality of film or television to the storytelling. Do you see your story in your mind like a movie before you write?

CHARITY NORMAN: I do, except it’s perhaps more immersive than a movie. For me, the fun of writing is imagining the entire story as though I were physically present. Much of this story takes place in Tuckbox café. I had a clear picture of the place and drew myself plans of the layout. I thought about sounds – the milk frother, the chatter, the radio, the smells of coffee and toasted sandwiches, and that London-winter-café feeling of warm radiators and cold blowing in every time someone opens the door. I spent time in cafés as part of the research – or so I claimed! Much the same process applied to other parts of the story – a Sussex farm, or a Rwandan hospital.

If The Secrets of Strangers were to be made into a film, are there any actors you’d like to play your characters?

Oh, that would be great! I think I would leave casting up to the experts. Mind you, if I had a magic wand it would be awfully tempting to invent a role for Daniel Craig just so I could look into his eyes …

You’ve written six novels – does it get easier, or is each book a different experience?

It doesn’t get easier. In fact as technology has become more sophisticated and online news more all-pervasive, I find it increasingly difficult not to be distracted. Of course, there are ways in which experience is a great help – for example, nowadays I write a detailed synopsis before I begin, so there are fewer blind alleys. I used to be swamped by self-doubt halfway through but now I’m writing book seven I recognise this symptom as normal, and press on. It takes a long time to put 115,000 or so words into the right order, and there are days when it feels like a chore. I need to be immersed in the story, to let the characters breathe and come alive, to edit again and again and again. None of that gets any easier!

What book has had the biggest impact on you? How has it influenced your writing?

Just one? So tricky! Well, I hugely admire the 20th century Irish writer, Molly Keane, especially her novel Good Behaviour. It’s exquisite – sharp and wry, occasionally vicious and never sloppy; it’s literary without being pleased with itself. Keane never gets her own cleverness get in the way of the story. This book has the most brilliantly portrayed naïve narrator I’ve ever met (or is she as naïve as she pretends to be?). I can never write like Molly Keane, but she is an inspiration to do better.

This book is set in London. Do you think this novel would be different if you set it in a small town?

It would have felt very different. I spend at least a month of every year in London, and most of my family live there, so it’s a second home to me. The city has a glorious vibrancy and I wanted to bring that into this story. People can be trapped in a café together, be very diverse and the chances are they won’t have met, have any acquaintances in common – try that in Waipukurau!

If your book was to be on a bookshelf next to two other books, who would you choose as its companions, and why?

The Long Way, a memoir by the iconic lone sailor Bernard Moitessier, because reading his words makes me remember that the planet is much bigger than its present troubles. And Notes from a Small Island by Bill Bryson, because he is hilarious and brilliant and just seeing the jacket cover makes me smile.

What are you reading now? What is next to be read?

I’m reading Anna Burns’ Milkman. Next on my list is The Cat and The City, by Nick Bradley, which is a fellow BBC Radio 2 Book Club pick.

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Author QandA Fake Baby - Amy McDaid Uncategorized

QandA with Amy McDaid

READ CLOSE: If you could say something to the Amy who is just starting to write Fake Baby, what would you tell her?

AMY MCDAID: I’m not sure I’d tell her anything! She doesn’t need advice, because I know she’d learn what she needed to at the right time, at the right place in the writing process, and that she will always have something to learn, and those lessons will be precious (and sometimes painful) when this happens. She doesn’t need added encouragement either, because (plot spoiler), she is going to eventually finish the damn thing without words from her older, somewhat more haggard self either. I’d give her a hug though. She likes those. Maybe a pat on the back too. 

You have three main characters in your novel Jaanvi, Lucas, and Stephen. Tell us about how you came to see this story best served by this set of characters and what is the dynamic you see between them?

It went the other way around really, because I started with the characters, and then I heard their story. As opposed to having the story and then creating the characters to serve it. It’s kinda like getting to know a person in real life. You start off with a small detail,  like a name, and then maybe you learn something on the surface, like what they do for a job. And then you hold a conversation and if you like each other it goes deeper and you become privy to some of their thoughts. Except I guess in writing, you get to take that step further — right up to when you’re deep inside their skin. And then you hear their story. So I guess, yes, for me, Fake Baby is character-driven, so the story serves them.

The dynamic — they all live in the same city, inhabit the same space, are struggling in some way. To others, they may appear as unusual, but to me they are all, ultimately, survivors and heroes in their own right. If they were to meet, you’d think they wouldn’t get on. But maybe, just maybe, they would. 

If Fake Baby were to be made into a TV show or a film, what actors would you want to play your three main characters?

Taika Waititi, this is a direct shout out to you. Please direct the film version of Fake Baby. I trust you to make the best call on the actors. (Though I think Ryan Gosling should be slotted in somewhere, perhaps as the good-looking homeless guy). p.s. if someone out there can give me Robin Cohen’s address, I’ll send her a free copy of Fake Baby. Will throw in some chocolates. 

I always look at books as part of a wider conversation. Tell me, if you can, two or three books that you would like to see Fake Baby site alongside in conversation, books that would inform and augment a reader’s experience of your novel. 

I love that — books as part of a conversation. I’d be curious to see Fake Baby alongside Ottessa Moshfegh’s My Year of Rest and Relaxation, and Eamonn Marra’s 2000ft Above Worry Level. They are very different novels, but are all contemporary with the same grain of dark funny, dealing with serious topics and mental distress while utilising humour that counteracts the bleak. They can’t and won’t appeal to everyone. The characters are polarising, certainly not always ‘lovable,’ (though I love them all with all of my heart), and their choices will be judged by society. Anyway, a good part of the reason why I chose these two books is I really like them, and I feel flattered by the idea of Fake Baby getting to hang out with them in conversation. 

What writers do you consider having had the most impact on your life, and your writing, and why? 

This is hard! I read so widely, and every time I read a book I learn something and then that’s stored away somewhere at the back of my brain, and then I move on to the next book. The books I love the most, that have stayed with me, impacted on my life, are not necessarily those I see as having had a big impact on my writing — in part because my writing is so different from theirs. I love unusual reads, the rambling stream-of-consciousness seen in Anna Burns’ The Milkman and Lucy Ellman’s Ducks, Newburyport. Reading Eimear McBride’s A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing was for me, like being hit by a truck. I was devastated and cried for hours after, which had never happened to me before with a book. I love Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Zadie Smith and Bernadine Evaristo for opening up worlds. All of these books have had a big impact on my life because they’ve helped me develop empathy for someone else’s experience — which is what the best literature does, in my opinion. But again, my writing is rather different from the sweeping narratives of these writers. 

For a direct, tangible impact on my writing, I’d probably have to be a little boring and go with some writing guides. Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott, and Reading Like a Writer by Francine Prose; the latter was suggested reading for the Master of Creative Writing. I read these at the very beginning of writing Fake Baby. Bird by Bird was important because it presented a reason to write beyond publication. And I was doing that anyway — I didn’t expect to be published at that point — but it was validating and spurred me forward. And Reading Like a Writer was great because it taught me how to interrogate my prose and specifically helped me a tonne with things like dialogue and detail. It’s a book I still pick up and read and continue to learn from.

What are you reading right now? What is next in line to be read?

I am just finishing off Ali Smith’s Spring. Love, love, love! The seasonal quartet is incredible for the speed they are produced and published to engage directly with the times. Though I’ve been a little slow getting to them! So I’m determined to read Summer as soon as it’s out. Next up — Caroline Barron’s memoir Ripiro Beach, which is getting great reviews. It’s about her near death experience after she gives birth, her journey through PTSD, and her journey of discovery into her Māori whakapapa.