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Author QandA The Girl In The Mirror - Rose Carlyle

QandA with Rose Carlyle

READ CLOSE: Your debut novel The Girl in The Mirror is a racy, pacy thriller – could you tell us about the writing of this book?

ROSE CARLYLE: I feel as though this story fell out of the sky fully formed, and I had no choice but to write it down. I’ve heard other writers (such as Elizabeth Gilbert) describe the feeling that the story chooses the writer, and although I don’t believe in supernatural stuff, there was something a bit spooky about the process.

My sister, Madeleine, and I were both trying to write novels and both considering trashing them and starting fresh with new ideas. One day at lunch, Maddie mentioned she would like to write a twin story. I felt as though I knew what she was going to say before she said it, because I wanted to write a twin story too. When we put our ideas together, the magic happened. We had the key plot points planned within an hour.

So it was as if the story was floating around in the sky, and half of it fell into my lap and half into Maddie’s. We had to put the halves together to make the story complete. Fortunately, Maddie wanted me to write the story, but she has put an enormous amount of energy into it, too. She’s like a pre-editor, helping me shape the story before, during and after the writing process.

Twins are such a fascinating pairing in a novel. Could you tell us why you made your protagonists twins and how that doubling and symmetry works in the novel storytelling?

To me, the special thing about fiction is that it allows you to inhabit someone else’s mind. I don’t know any other art form that creates such a deep experience of living somebody else’s experience. Movies come close, but in a movie you are usually still watching the characters from the outside. When you finish reading Jane Eyre, you feel that you are Jane. Sometimes that feeling persists for a long time.

I wanted to take that idea one step further. If readers love being somebody else, what about a story about a character who tries to become someone else for real? I wasn’t drawn to writing sci-fi or fantasy, so a way for me to explore that idea was with identical twins.

Iris and Summer sail across the Indian Ocean, and you write this part of the novel with such clarity and evoke the feeling of isolation and beauty so well. You obviously have an affinity with the sea and sailing: do you think the ocean and its latent danger will feature in future work?

Yes, I think I can safely say the ocean will feature in future work, because I never plan to write about the ocean, but it always manages to sneak in. I wish I could have depicted the ocean as less dangerous, though. In real life, sailing is not scary. Perhaps one day I will write a book in which the ocean is better behaved.

If The Girl in The Mirror is made into a film, who would you love to see in the role of Iris and Summer?

My kids have been fan-casting the novel since I read them a sample chapter back in 2018. One son votes for Samara Weaving, the other for Margot Robbie, but the running joke in our household is that one of them could play each twin. My daughter, Florence, wants her namesake Florence Pugh. I can only tell you who is perfect for the audiobook and that is Holly Robinson. When I heard her audition tape, I felt as though they found the real Iris. I’m told the audiobook will be ready in August and I’m extremely excited about it.

If The Girl In The Mirror was sitting on my bookshelf, what two or three other books would you hope to see stacked beside it?

I would hope to see War and Peace, The Best American Science Writing of 2019, and The Day My Bum Went Psycho, because I hope that people read all sorts of books—and, like me, don’t have time to organise their bookshelves. I didn’t learn how to write a thriller by religiously reading other thrillers. I believe that everything you read influences your writing somehow, so you’ve got more chance of finding your own voice if you read widely and randomly. I’m a big fan of picking up some forgotten treasure at your friend’s uncle’s bach and reading it in order to learn what was once popular. Or just read it because it’s a book and you’re a reader.

Tell us about some of the books and the writers who have been influential in your writing.

I know I’m meant to list other thrillers, but honestly, some of them are too scary for me. I’m sure there are writers who have influenced me, but I don’t know who they are, because I’ve read thousands of books in my life and they’re all blended together in my brain like a soup that’s been cooking too long. So, my all-time faves include Austen, the Brontë sisters, George Eliot, the Russians from Tolstoy to Nabokov, and Marilynne Robinson. How you get from there to writing a thriller is beyond me.

What are you reading now? What is on your To Be Read pile?

Now I’m going to contradict myself because I just advocated for serendipitous reading, but I don’t have much time for it these days. As a Kiwi author who is published in Australia, America and the UK, it’s almost part of the job description to keep up with the latest thrillers from all these countries, as well as other notable fiction from anywhere in the world. I also feel that I want to keep delving into the past. There are still some classics I haven’t read, like Don Quixote. Right now I am halfway through Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, The Year of Pleasures by Elizabeth Berg and All the Birds, Singing by Evie Wyld. Then I want to catch up with the latest thrillers by Chris Hammer and Ruth Ware.

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